New York Music Daily

No New Abnormal

Tag: Sharkmuffin

Snag Sharkmuffin’s Twisted Anne Boleyn T-Shirt While You Can

As you can tell from all the snazzy graphics and fancy multimedia just oozing from every corner of this page in eyeball-rotating Technicolor, this blog is really into fashion.

OK, #sarcasm.

But every once in awhile a band comes up with a merch item that’s too good to resist. All-female trio Sharkmuffin – who play a haphazardly individualistic, reverbtoned blend of punk, surf rock and psychedelia – have a new band t-shirt to die for. It’s Anne Boleyn playing bass.

The print on the shirt is a medieval portrait of Anne Boleyn playing delicately with a pick. Her hands are tiny; the neck is thin (just like hers, ha). She’s not playing any recognizable chord, or for that matter, with any recognizable technique: must be that weird lute tuning she’s used to (reputedly, she played that instrument competently). $15 plus shipping, or pick one up at a show.

Sharkmuffin are at the Broadway in Bushwick on Jan 11 at around 10. Explosive, theatrical, phantasmagorical indie/metal band A Deer A Horse open the night at 9; cover is $12. Sharkmuffin are also at Our Wicked Lady on the 19th at 10:30 by themselves, for two bucks less.

Sharkmuffin Cook Up Their Most Psychedelic Record Yet

All-female Brooklyn trio Sharkmuffin named their band well. They’ve grown up in public, more or less, playing irrepressibly fun, messy, loud music. They started out as a punk band and lately have been embracing garage rock, psychedelia, spacerock and surf sounds. For a band who like to keep their songs short, they pack a lot into them. Their new album Gamma Gardening is streaming at Bandcamp; they’re playing the release show at Alphaville at 11 PM on April 5. Cover is ten bucks. 

Tarra Thiessen’s blasts of distorted guitar punctuate Natalie Kirch’s catchy 60s garage rock bassline as the opening track, Receptionist pounces along, up to a spacy psychedelic chorus. This receptionist turns out to be really mean!

Designer Baby is a two-parter. “I’ve taken all these drugs,” Thiessen intones as the slow, Siouxsie-esque first verse slinks along in a sea of reverb effects, then the band punk it out and take it doublespeed. Serpentina is more labyrinthine than snaky: it could be Castle Black with treblier guitars.

Early Sleater-Kinney aggro meets Brian Jonestown Massacre swirl and early Jesus & Mary Chain guitar shriek in the album’s most epic track, Too Many Knobs. The final cut is Fate; Thiessen pulls out her slide over a ba-bump bassline in tandem with Jordyn Blakely’s drums. It sounds like a scruffier take on what Siouxsie was doing during the brief period when Robert Smith was playing guitar in the band. What’s the chance that you’ll ever hear anything this catchy or fun in Bushwick?