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Tag: Matt McDonald Trombone

Epic Grandeur and Cool Subtleties with the Christopher Zuar Orchestra at Symphony Space

If there’s a future for big band jazz, it’s in good hands with Christopher Zuar. Him, and Ben Kono, the ubiquitous multi-reedman who seems to be front and center at pretty much every good big band performance in this city these days, including plenty of lyrical work on alto sax and oboe at the Christopher Zuar Orchestra’s ecstatic, dynamic show Thursday night at Symphony Space..The nineteen-piece ensemble, including the composer out front on the podium, comprised members of the various Mingus repertory bands, the Maria Schneider Orchestra and the Alan Ferber Nonet. Notwithstanding this group’s camaraderie, never mind a program packed with strong tunesmithing and all sorts of ideas worth stealing, Zuar has staked a claim in an ever-shrinking field dominated by a few iconic composers and Jazz Hall of Fame personalities: Ron Carter, David Murray and Roy Hargrove, for instance. Suffice it to say that at the end of the day, filthy lucre is not the name of the game: you have to do this out of pure passion. This group had plenty of that, as does Zuar’s debut album, Musings, this blog’s choice as best jazz debut of 2016.

The concert gave an impressively full house a chance to revel in the nuance as well as the big hooks that Zuar has made his stock in trade. To see that the night’s best number was not a richly conversational new arrangement of Egberto Gismonti’s rippling, tropical epic 7 Aneis, or the plaintive ballad Lonely Road, but Zuar’s newest number of the night, portends well for his career. He introduced that diptych, Native Tongue, as his way of writing his way out of a musical existential crisis in the wake of the album’s release earlier this spring. The composition turned out to be a dynamically crescendoing anthem matching brooding Bach, bright Brazil, an enigmatic second part fueled by Mike Holober’s incisive piano paired with Mark Ferber’s terse drumming, a moodily expressive Charles Pillow clarinet solo that finally soared skyward, and an almost defiantly fiery, brass-fueled coda

Otherwise, despite the grandeur and majesty of the rest of the program, it was the subtle moments that resonated the most. The subtle handoffs between voices to complete a phrase, and the sarcastic trick ending that Zuar spun inside out at the end of the opening number, Remembrance, were among the most memorable. But so was the sheerly cantabile, singalong balance between brass and winds in Of Certain Uncertainty, which matched  the actual vocalese, sung with relish by Aubrey Johnson. She’s a major addition to this band. Jo Lawry does a fine job on the album, but Johnson brought a touch of sass and brass, found the inner blue-eyed soul ballad at the center of Vulnerable States and brought out every ounce of it. She may be best known for her bell-like clarity, but this show reminded how much else she has up her sleeve.

Guitarist Pete McCann got a chance to chew the scenery with a completely over-the-top metal solo midway through Ha! Joke’s on You – centered around a “uh-oh, here comes trouble” funk riff – winding it up with a just plain hilarious, furtive glissando at the end that had both the band and audience in stitches.

The second set was a bit shorter but every bit as eclectic, including a spiraling, achingly lyrical soprano sax solo from Jason Rigby on the blustery So Close, So Far Away, along with the wryly humorous Chaconne – with elements of both Bach and Led Zep – and the aptly titled Anthem. In sum, a lush and incisive performance by a crew that also included Dave Pietro on alto sax, Carl Maraghi on baritone sax; Tony Kadleck, Jay Owens, Dave Smith and Matt Holman on trumpets; Matt McDonald, Mark Patterson and Alan Ferber on trombones; another ubiquitously welcome presence, Jennifer Wharton on bass trombone; and Aidan O’Donnell on bass. If everybody here can find time in their schedules, it would be rewarding to see this band get a traditional Monday night residency somewhere. Jazz Gallery, are you interested?

The South American Music Festival Winds Up Booking Agent Weekend on a High Note

For ambitious concertgoers with the stamina to stand for hours through band after band, the dozens of shows programmed around the annual January booking agents’ convention can be a real bargain. Aside from the handful of free concerts, Monday’s South American Music Festival showcase at Drom was among this year’s best, starting out a raptly low-key note and quickly growing into a big fiesta.

You might not expect a percussion-and-vocal duo to play lullabies, but that’s essentially what singer Sofía Tosello and innovative percussionist Franco Pinna’s hypnotic new folk-trance duo Chuño did to get the night started. In addition to his usual battery of south-of-the-border objects, Pinna played his new invention, the arpa legüera, a sort of cross between a hammered dulcimer and an Argentine harp. The sound was closer to the former than the latter, adding mutedly twinkling ambience under Tesello’s dynamically-charged vocals as she ranged from gentle and unadorned to more dramatic intensity where she aired out the lower-register power that distinguishes her work in latin jazz and tango. Guitarist Juancho Herrera – who is a real beast, and was vastly underutilized here – delivered a single, tantalizingly uneasy, punchy original number out in front of the band. Likewise, genre-defying singer Sofia Rei led the group through a coyly chirpy, polyrhythmic mashup of subequatorial jazz and John Zorn-ish indie classical, drawing on her background as a member of Zorn’s all-female a-capella quartet Mycale.

Electroacoustic avant garde singer Ximena was next on the bill, followed by irrepressible percussionist Cyro Baptista’s Banquet of the Spirits. For those unfamiliar with the latter’s celebratory sound, the blog most recently caught his act at last year’s Bang on a Can Marathon, leading a smaller group. What’s cool about these multi-act bills is that if there’s a lull in the action, or a band you’ve already checked off your bucket list, you can always go run errands. Who says multitasking is only something you do online? When you run a busy blog, sometimes that’s your only option.

Hints of an iconic art-rock epic wafted from guitarist José Luis Pardo’s loop pedal as his three-piece tropical psychedelic supergroup Los Crema Paraiso – with five-string bassist Bam Bam Rodriguez and Neil Ochoa, late of Chicha Libre, on drums – took the stage. This blog caught them most recently at Barbes, where they went on half an hour late since Pardo was busy loading that pedal with some of the overdubs from Pink Floyd’s Shine On You Crazy Diamond, Part 1 – and then they played the whole thing, pretty much note for note. Getting to hear that this past August from the best spot in the house – the next-to-last seat at the bar, right under the air conditioning duct – was an awful lot of fun. Were they going to do that again here? Well, sort of. Rather than recreate an art-rock classic, Pardo stuck to playing the melody lines, using his wah to max out the psychedelic factor, Ochoa propelling the music with a lighter, more incisive touch than Nick Mason’s thud on the original. And they did cut it a little short.

From there, they picked up the pace, playing along to snippets of Venezuelan films from the past several decades, bringing a new dimension to several numbers from the band’s latest album De Pelicula and Pardo’s ongoing project of writing new theme music for his favorite old movies. Pardo blazed through furious volleys of crime-theme tremolo-picking juxtaposed with lingering, summery washes as the rhythm section took a comfortable Pacific coastal route. From there they mashed up galloping Pink Floyd psychedelia with bouncy Mexican themes, blistering 70s art-rock with Venezuelan stoner-folk riffage and balmy motorik interludes. You wouldn’t probably consider anything motorik to be the least bit balmy, but this band made it happen. And it’s a miracle that Pardo didn’t break any strings: the guy really punishes them, and on the coldest night of the year so far, he was drenched in sweat.

The Gregorio Uribe Big Band closed the evening with their high-voltage, original blend of just about every large-ensemble sound in the Western Hemisphere. Uribe distinguishes himself as a rare accordionist-bandleader and composer of intricately fascinating big band jazz equally informed by salsa, various latin folk styles and swing. In a way he’s sort of the Carl Nielsen of tropical music – and a hell of a crooner as well. The dancefloor filled in a second as he led the big sixteen-piece vehicle into a slinky cumbia, which they scampered out of at doublespeed. Unsurprisingly, the band’s biggest hit of the evening was another cumbia, Uribe really getting the dancers twirling when he hit an oldschool two-chord vamp on his accordion. Otherwise, he sent a lickety-split, punchy shout-out to his native Colombia as the band swelled and blazed behind him, then swirled and dipped through a couple of fiery salsa dance numbers.

It was a lot of fun to watch alto saxophonist Sharel Cassity think on her feet, judiciously weaving a lattice of post-Coltrane riffage out of a simple Afro-Cuban theme. Likewise, baritone saxophonist Roberto Bustamante contributed a couple of smoldering solos, as did trombonist Matt McDonald and trumpeter Sam Hoyt, among other group members. The audience screamed for an otra after the group had swung through a lively Caribbean cha-cha and band intros were done, and Uribe rewarded them with a final cumbia harking back to the glory days when Bogota bandleaders like Lucho Bermudez took coastal gangster rhythms and bulked them up for cosmopolitan dancefloor crowds. Uribe’s big band return to their regular home turf, Zinc Bar, at 9 PM on February 5.

The Gregorio Uribe Big Band Air Out Their Mighty, Slinky Cumbia Sounds at Two Shows This Coming Week

The Gregorio Uribe Big Band are one of those groups whose music is so fun that it transcends category. Is it cumbia? Big band jazz? Salsa? It’s a little of all that, and although it’s a sound that draws on a lot of traditions from south of the border, it’s something that probably only could have happened in New York. For more than three years, the mighty sixteen-piece ensemble has held a monthly residency at Zinc Bar. They’ve also got two enticing upcoming shows: one at Winter Jazzfest, on their regular home turf at twenty minutes before midnight on Friday, January 15 (you’ll need a festival pass for that), and also at about 10:30 PM on January 18 as part of this year’s South American Music Festival at Drom. That lineup, in particular, is pretty amazing, starting at 7:30 PM with magically eclectic singer (and member of Sara Serpa’s dreamy Mycale project) Sofía Rei, slashingly eclectic Pan-American guitarist Juancho Herrera and band, singer Sofía Tosello & innovative percussionist Franco Pinna’s hypnotic new folk-trance duo Chuño, then Uribe, then the psychedelic, surfy, vallenato-influenced art-rock groovemeisters Los Crema Paraiso and extrovert percussionist Cyro Baptista’s group at the top of the bill sometime in the wee hours. Advance tix are $20.

Frontman Uribe leads the group from behind his accordion, and sings – it’s hard to think of another large ensemble in New York fronted by an accordionist. Those textures add both playfulness and plaintiveness to Uribe’s vibrant, machinegunning charts. The group’s debut album, Cumbia Universal – streaming at Sondcloud – opens with Yo Vengo (Here I Come), with its mighty polyrhythmic pulse between trombones and trumpets, all sorts of neat counterpoint, and Uribe’s accordion teasing the brass to come back at him. They take it doublespeed at the end.  ¿Qué Vamos a Hacer Con Este Amor? (What Are We Going to Do with This Love?) is a funny salsa-jazz number spiced with dancing exchanges of horn voicings, a duet between Uribe and chanteuse Solange Pratt. She has lot of fun teasing him in his role as a chill pro, trying to resist her temptations.

El Avispao (The Cheater) isn’t about infidelity – it’s a bouncily sarcastic commentary on the corruption that plagues Latin America, with a sardonic tv-announcer cameo and faux fanfares from the brass. The intro to Goza Cada Dia (Enjoy Yourself) has one of the most gorgeous horn charts in years, expanding into individual voices as it goes along: there are echoes of Memphis soul, Afro-Cuban jazz and classic 70s roots reggae, but ultimately this is Uribe’s triumph. Ruben Blades duets with the bandleader on the album’s title track, a jubilant mashup of Caribbean and Pacific coastal cumbia, with a dixieland-tinged solo from Linus Wynsch’s clarinet and a more wryly gruff one from baritone saxophonist Carl Maraghi.

¿Por Qué Se Ira Mi Niño? portrays the anguish of losing a child – Uribe’s native Colombia has a higher infant mortality rate than this country, perhaps three times worse. Matt McDonald’s brooding trombone underscores the sadness of the vocals on the intro, then the band takes it toward salsa noir territory. The soca-flavored Caribe Contigo offers upbeat contrast, anchored by stormy brass and capped off with sailing clarinet. Welcome to La Capital, a bustling Bogota street scene, brings to mind the psychedelic lowrider soul of early 70s War, Ignacio Hernandez’ guitar sparkling amid the endless handoffs among the horns.

The cumbia cover of the Beatles’ Come Together is just plain hilarious – and the way the original vocal line gets shifted to the brass isn’t even the funniest part. The album winds up with the unexpectedly bristling, hi-de-ho noir cumbia jazz of  Ya Comenzó La Fiesta (The Party Starts Here). Crank this in your earphones as you try to multitask, but expect people to be looking at you because you won’t be able to sit still.

State-of-the-Art Big Band Jazz and a Shapeshifter Show by John Yao & His 17-Piece Instrument

John Yao is one of New York’s elite trombonists, and a frequent performer with both Arturo O’Farrill’s Afro-Latin Jazz Orchestra and the Vanguard Jazz Orchestra.Yao is also a first-class, ambitious and witty composer and leader of his own all-star large ensemble, John Yao and His 17-Piece Instrument. They have a new album, Flip-Flop, and a release show at 7 PM on June 17 at Brooklyn’s home for big band jazz, Shapeshifter Lab, with sets at 7 and 8:15 PM and an enticingly low $10 cover.

As you might imagine from a trombonist, the album is a big, bright, brassy extravaganza. But it’s also full of unexpected dynamics, dips and rises, imaginative voicings and occasional sardonic humor. The title track bookends punchy brass exchanges around a couple of long sax-and-rhythm-section vectors upward, John O’Gallagher on alto and Rich Perry on tenor, the two engaging in a genial conversation midway through. New Guy is Yao at his sardonic best: a moody, syncopated vamp with fluttery brass gives way to punchy swing with cleverly echoing voices, Andy Gravish’s stairstepping trumpet leading into to more serioso trombone from Yao and then a pugilistic exchange that builds to a hopeful crescendo and then a memorable punchline.

Slow Children at Play follows a bright, balmy clave stroll, echoing Yao’s work with the O’Farrill band, with a warmly considered Rich Perry tenor sax solo that builds to a lively exchange with the brass, followed by a summery trombone-and-rhythm-section interlude. It’s very New York. For that matter, the same could be said for the two “soundscapes” here, group improvisation in a Butch Morris vein, the first a luminously suspenseful intro of sorts with shivery violin at its center, the second with a similarly apprehensive, cinematic sweep.

With a blazing brass kickoff, impressively terse yet punchy David Smith trumpet solo and bustling Jon Irabagon tenor sax solo, the gritty swing tune Hellgate is the most trad and also the catchiest number here. Opening with Yao’s own moody trombone, Reflection shifts toward noir, its resonant, shifting sheets building a tensely expectant ambience with a lull for pianist Jesse Stacken’s brooding excursion and then a rewardingly brass-fueled crescendo. Yao’s sense of humor and aptitude for relating a good yarn take centerstage on Ode to the Last Twinkie, its playful echo effects and Jon Irabagon’s droll, eye-rolling tenor sax offering a nod to Arnold Schoenberg.

Illumination also features those echoes that Yao likes so much, a much more serious piece with Alejandro Aviles’ spiraling flute and Frank Basile’s energetic baritone sax over a tensely hypnotic piano riff, the brass falling into place with a mighty domino effect, Stacken adding a cascading, neoromantically-tinged break. The album winds up with the hard-swinging Out of Socket. Taken as a whole, it’s a tight, adrenalizing performance by a collection of first-call NYC jazz talent that also includes trumpeters John Walsh and Jason Wiseman; Luis Bonilla, Matt McDonald, Kajiwara Tokunori and Jennifer Wharton on trombones; Robert Sabin on bass and Vince Cherico on drums. As the album’s just out, it hasn’t hit the usual streaming spots yet, but Yao has lots of good stuff on his music page including several of these tracks.