New York Music Daily

No New Abnormal

Tag: kyuss

Searing, Fuzzy Doom Metal From Swedish Band Lowrider

Swedish band Lowrider do not play Los Angeleno funk. Hard-riffing stoner metal in a Kyuss/Sleep vein is more their thing. Their album Refractions is streaming at Bandcamp. Strong hum-along hooks and interesting psychedelic textures pervade this – they’re a rare metal band who don’t waste notes.

The first track, Red River has a fat fuzztone riffage from the band’s two guitarists – frontman Ola Hellquist on lead and Niclas Stalfors on rhythm – over drummer Andreas Eriksson’s ba-bump beat, tantalizingly brief wah-wah guitar and a weird, echoey bridge. They do the ba-bump thing a little more artfully in Ode to Ganymede – the funeral-parlor organ, atmospherics and a wry guitar solo that sounds like a talkbox but is probably just Hellquist fiddling with his wah are unexpected touches amid the crunch and sludge.

In the hypnotic, almost nine-minute Semanders Krog, the band shift in and out of a tricky beat, indulge in some minimalist atmospherics and finally rise to a long, sputtering trails of sparks from Hellquist’s wah-wah. Mule Pepe is just as trippy but a lot more straightforward, beatwise and riffwise; finally, three tracks in, we get a few seconds of solo bass and drums, and a classic devil’s-horns salute for an outro.

The instrumental Sun Devil is based around a simple, classic series of variations playing off a low E; Peder Bergstrand’s bass is tuned a whole octave lower. The closing epic, Pipe Rider, has growling guitars in tandem with the organ and unexpectely new wave-tinged synth over Eriksson’s shamanistic drums. On one hand, this sound has been done to death over the years – because every year, another generation of alienated kids discover Black Sabbath and the thousands of bands they influenced. Long may they play this stuff.

Edgy, Brilliantly Original, Heavy Psychedelic Sounds from Eidetic Seeing

Brooklyn Band Eidetic Seeing play a smartly tuneful, unpredictable, defiantly original mix of noise-rock, third-generation post-Sabbath stoner metal and postrock, veering from a focused Mogwai attack to sunbaked, fuzztone Kyuss riffage, to uneasy interludes that echo Goo-era Sonic Youth. Their new second album, Against Nature, is angry and dirty, haphazard but intricate, packed with catchy hooks and abrasive noise. Tempos shift and unwind as guitarist Sean Forlenza and bassist Danilo Randjic-Coleman plunge from restless jangle to a roar over the artful and richly dynamic, even understated drumming of Paul Feitzinger. His individualistic, coloristic groove is one of this band’s most instantly distinguishing features, with a heavy, echoing snare sound in contrast to his nimble attack on the kick drum and intricate cymbal work. The whole album is streaming at their Bandcamp page.

Dial up the opening instrumental, A Snake Whose Years Are Long and name that riff: it’s something iconic from the 80s or 90s. The band quickly takes it from there to an uneasily jangling, slashing pulse, then shifts into a fuzztone rumble, then back and forth with shrieking SY-ish guitar and up-and-down dynamics. Like the rest of the tracks here, it’s a long one, but because it’s so unpredictable it never loses your interest. White Flight morphs from atmospherics to a bolero beat to an undulating stoner groove with all kinds of tempo and timbre shifts, from early 70s bluesmetal to squalling noiserock.

The sarcastically titled Froleuse works the tension between fuzztone riff-rock and lingering, apprehensive, 80s-tinged lo-fi sonics, acidic chords, endless metric trickery and finally a screamed, anguished hardcore outro. Ashplant Blues is sort of their Electric Funeral, a ten-minute epic that begins as a macabre, chromatically-charged dirge that once again gets abrasively noisy, then morphs into janglerock, then leaps around before falling away into atmospherics. The longest and final track is K2, which seems to be an account of murder high above the treeline. Again, it opens as a dirge, the most anthemic thing here. The way Feitzinger keeps the menacing groove going even as the guitar and bass fuzz out and recede toward the horizon is one of the album’s high points. There’s so much more going on in these songs; this is just the Cliff Note version. This is one of the most consistently original and interesting albums of 2013. You can catch Eidetic Seeing (the band name means photographic memory) on January 23 at Grand Victory in Williamsburg.