New York Music Daily

No New Abnormal

Tag: gordon au

Saluting One of New York’s Most Consistently Entertaining Weekly Residencies

Just about every Monday starting at around 7 PM, Brain Cloud play Barbes. While they take their name from a Bob Wills song, western swing is just one of the styles they play, along with jump blues, hot 20s swing and dixieland. The core of the band got their start in the busker scene in the mid-zeros as the Cangelosi Cards, and then at Banjo Jim’s began one of New York’s longest-running residencies. When that venue closed, they moved their weekly Monday night gig to Barbes and haven’t looked back. They’ll be back there on Nov 12 at 7, playing two sets and followed at around 10 by the NYC Gaita Club – a Bulla en el Barrio spinoff – who do rustically pounding Afro-Colombian trance-dance jams with a rotating cast of reed flute players.

In addition to his work with Brain Cloud, multi-instrumentalist Dennis Lichtman can often be found with other jazz acts. His most recent album under his own name is Just Cross the River, a joyously conversational tribute to the jazz roots of Queens, streaming at Bandcamp. Much as almost all the tracks are originals, everything here fits a late 20s/early 30s swing milieu.

The group here call themselves the Queensboro Six, opening the record with a boisterously shuffling shout-out to the 7 train that follows all sorts of clever modulations. With Brain Cloud, Lichtman plays clarinet, violin and mandolin; here, he sticks to the licorice, with a plaintively melismatic solo to kick off For Bix, a tribute to the jazz great who died in his Queens apartment in 1931. Trumpeter Gordon Au and trombonist J. Walter Hawkes harmonize with their mutes over a sotto-voce strut from bassist Nathan Peck.

Midnight at the Piers is not a seedy Chelsea tableau but a celebration of Gantry Plaza State Park in Long Island City, portrayed here as latin noir with Arabic allusions and a slinky bolero groove from drummer Rob Garcia that shifts into contented wee-hours swing.

Mazz Swift’s jaunty violin livens Road Street Court Place Avenue Drive, a jump blues wryly referencing the borough’s crazy street address system – if you can call it a system. Swift also plays and contributes a low-key, knowing vocal on Someday You’ll Be Sorry.

Pianist Dalton Ridenhour gives Waltz for Camila a lowlit pulse and a saturnine lyricism as Lichtman gets balmy and Peck takes a moody stroll. The horns triangulate dixieland-style in LIC Strut, Lichtman taking one of his most expansively spiraling solos as the music darkens momentarily.

Guest Jerron Paxton sings and plays guitar on the album’s title track, a sunny, shuffling duet with Lichtman. Terry Wilson gets torchy on the mic for the aphoristic Fats Waller hit Blue Turning Grey Over You and returns a bit later for a sultry version of another of the Queens resident’s iconic tunes, Squeeze Me.

23rd Between 23rd and 23rd – an address that could mean several different Queens blocks – is immortalized as a jump blues with a coyly tiptoeing piano solo and flurrying guitar from guest Nick Russo.

The album’s most lickety-split and most sort-of-modern-sounding – i.e. 1940 – number is The Power of Not Then, with Russo on guitar again. Likewise, the steady, strolling, somewhat bittersweet I’d Remember Having Met You is a period-perfect, bittersweet late 30s/early 40s ballad. They close with a scampering take of Cake Walking Babies From Home, an early number by another Queens guy, Louis Armstrong, with Paxton on vocals.

The Hot Jazz Jumpers Revisit and Reinvent the Wildly Syncretic Spirit of the 1920s

True to their name, the Hot Jazz Jumpers‘s sound springboards off of oldtimey 20s and 30s swing. And in the spirit of those mostly unsung, regional combos who ripped up dancefloors back in the day, the Hot Jazz Jumpers mash up styles from all over the map. The seventeen tracks on their new album The Very Next Thing and live concert dvd comprise swing, delta blues, southern rock, C&W, Carolina Coast folk music, free improvisation and more. So their sound is totally retro – yet completely in the here and now, another case where the old is new again. they’re playing the album release show on Friday, November 6 at 11 PM in the cozy confines at Pete’s, which should be party in a box – literally. As a bonus, guitarist/bandleader Nick Russo does double duty, opening the night at 10 with a set with his ambitious large-ensemble jazz project Nick Russo +11, who’re celebrating their ninth year in business.

The new album opens with a scampering take of Back Home Again in Indiana, sung by banjoist/guitarist/dancer Betina Hershey. Lots of period-perfect, quirky touches here, from the twin banjos, to Walter Stinson’s sotto vocce bass solo, even a dinner bell. They follow that with Freight Train, a dobro-driven oldtime C&W tune, Hershey’s honeyed vocals evoking Laura Cantrell. The take of Caravan here is a long, loose, otherworldly-tinged shuffle with vocalist Miles Griffith’s rustic, impassioned gullah-inspired vocals, Russo’s spiraling solo echoing Gordon Au’s jaunty trumpet lines.

Griffith’s gruffly animated scatting contrasts with Hershey’s summery warmth on You Are My Sunshine, reinvented as a sprawling soukous jam. Nobody But My Baby Is Getting My Love gets an oldtimey banjo swing treatment livened with Josh Holcomb’s wry, amiable trombone.  Russo and Griffith do both In a Mellow Tone and Manha de Carnaval as a duo, the ancient paired against the brand-new.

Driven by Russo’s slide guitar, Jock-a-Mo looks back to the Grateful Dead, if with considerably more focus. Dirty 40 slowly builds from stark delta blues to a Stonesy ba-bump Beggars Banquet groove. Fueled by the banjos and Hershey’s sassy delivery, Sweet Georgia Brown mashes up 40s swing, bucolic string band ambience and an Aiko Aiko Crescent City bounce. They keep the Aiko Aiko thing going through the spirited Jam for Lenny.

Hershey’s nuanced sense of angst breathes new life into a slowly swinging, bristling, banjo-propelled take of Ain’t Misbehavin. By contrast, they do Got My Mojo Working as a loose Mississippi juke joint jam, Russo’s slide guitar front and center. The upbeat dance vibe continues through the oldtimey swing of When the Red Red Robin Goes Bob-Bob-Bobbin’ Along, then the band mashes up gospel, gullah folk and bluegrass in This Little Light of Mine. There’s also a second take of Jock-a-Mo and a lively jam on the way out. The album hasn’t officially hit the street just yet, but copies are available at shows and the opening track is up at soundcloud.