New York Music Daily

No New Abnormal

Tag: death metal

Empire de Mu Raise a Lost Continent to Explosive Heights

We know from the spread of animal species around the world, from Africa outward, that there were once vast expanses of land where there is only ocean now. Accounts vary widely as to why these land bridges disappeared. The most commonly accepted explanation is the plate tectonic theory. Others believe that these once-fertile land masses sank because the earth’s crust had not yet solidified enough to keep them above sea level. A much more sinister theory is that they were destroyed by aliens using a beam weapon from outer space: an ancient precursor to 5G.

Empire de Mu build on James Churchward’s von Daniken-like tales of the lost continent of Lemuria, or Mu, in their colorful, explosive new album Spiritual Demise, streaming at Bandcamp. It’s a wild mix of angst-fueled High Romantic classical melodies, snarling metal and mathrock beats.

They open with a somberly cinematic, cello-driven overture, frontwoman Arianne Fleury leading a choir of voices up to the crunchy, constantly shifting rhythms of the first song, Submersion. Drummer Tommy pummels his way through the maze as guitarist David Gagné and bassist Sami El Agha solidify into a menacing chromatic theme. Throughout the album, Fleury sings and roars in French, English and Spanish, no doubt drawing on an operatic background.

In the second track, Under the Black Sun, it’s Gagné’s turn to build a thorny thicket of minor-key riffage, capped off with a supersonic solo as Fleury shifts from arioso drama to a death metal rasp. Ouloum II is much the same but shorter. After that, Fleury ranges from the top of her formidable range to the grim lows at the bottom in Death Lotus, Gagné building a savage web of tremolo-picking and minor-key chromatics.

El Agha switches to buzuq for the haunting, tantalizingly short Egyptian-flavored instrumental Souk: he could have gone on for three times as long and nobody would be complaining. It’s a good segue into Ruins of Lemuria, Gagné constructing his most ornate, grimly symphonic melodic lattice.

From there they segue into the frantic Naacalls, rising from low-midrange roar to yet another sizzling series of Gagné solos. They close with Faithed Sorrow, a tragic, Romany-tinged coda.

These days, some believe that humanity is in many respects reliving the end of the Lemurian Age. According to this argument, the lockdowners plan to use 5G microwave weapon satellites to crush any remaining opposition to the needle of death, lockdown restrictions and surveillance, by frying entire populations who refuse to comply. That would explain why free countries like Nicaragua and Croatia, and the fourteen free US states, have been allowed to liberate themselves up to this point.

A Strangely Anthemic, Crushing Blend of Styles From the Aptly Named Evil Drive

If you’re a metal fan, you probably wouldn’t think that death metal vocals, ornate Iron Maiden-style tunesmithing and retro 80s guitar flash would make much sense together. Evil Drive’s new album Demons Within – streaming at Spotify – is a mashup of all of that. It’s the kind of record where your first reaction is WTF. Forty-tive minutes and ten tracks later, it suddenly hits you that you’re still listening.

Take this evil drive and you’ll get it. The intro to the first cut is so predictable it’s funny – except that’s stiletto heels stalking the pavement, not leather boots. Frontwoman Viktoria Viren does the nails-down-the-throat rasp in English over the thrash of guitarists J-P Pusa and Ville Viren, bassist Matti Sorsa and drummer Antti Tani, until they slow down for a second for the chorus.

Track two, Chains is a strangely catchy blend of hardcore/thrash rhythms, peak-era Maiden and sly, showoffy 80s guitar tapping. It’s easy to imagine Bruce Dickinson doing his operatic thing over the ornate, symphonic changes of the title cut, peaking out with an Arabic-tinged guitar solo midway through.

The band go back to the thrashy verse/lushly orchestral chorus template for Revenge, with gritty, scrambling leads and tricky rhythmic changes. We Are the One – an original, not the punk classic by the Avengers – is a big, stampeding Run to the Hills-type anthem, the longest and best song on the album.

Stun-gun staccato and searing twin leads threaten to take Too Wild off the rails. Lords, the next track, is the big hit, a more crazed take on gloomily anthemic European stadium metal.

The machinegunning assault reaches a peak with more than a hint of horror surf in Bringer, then with the ninth track, In the End, we finally get a fractured ballad – who would have expected to find elegant twelve-string picking on an album like this? They close it with Ghost, which with its stampeding drive and total Powerslave-era Maiden guitar duel is anything but ghostly.

There isn’t a single idea on this record that hasn’t been used before, but nobody’s figured out how to put them all together like this band. Raise your lighter to the hope that we can see them in one of those stadiums they ought to be playing this summer.

Relentless, Gloomy Intensity, Tight Songs and a Greenpoint Show by Murky Texas Metal Band Frozen Soul

There’s a typically explosive triplebill at St. Vitus on the fifth of the month with metalcore shredders Steel Bearing Hand, the even faster death metal Vomit Forth and then the much murkier Texas power trio Frozen Soul. These Sunday shows start early at around 7; cover is $12.

Frozen Soul’s debut ep from the spring of last year is up at Bandcamp as a free download: smart move for a band looking to build a fan base to share their stuff and come out to shows In a style that can be painfully cartoonish, it’s cool to hear these guys’ tasty, purposeful guitar, looming downtuned bass and drums that deliver these relatively short songs to a timely end.

Wind whips around behind a doomy dirge as the first track, Encased in Ice gets underway: the band pick it up, shifting rhythms around creepy chromatic riffage, vocals half-buried in the mix. So many promising metal bands ruin their sound with cliched, pigsnorting vocals: good to see these guys steering away from all that.

The band go sprinting into Hand of Vengeance, then slow it down, Motorhead style. The one cover on the ep is Mortician‘s Witches Coven: the group match the original’s macabre music-box intro but find the song’s inner Sabbath, with much better production that maxes out the vortex factor. From there they segue into the final cut, Merciless: like the rest of the tracks here, you can get lost in the tight, hypnotic tremolo-picking and then get jarred back into reality when the rhythm suddenly whiplashes you.