Punchy Afrobeat Grooves From Surefire Sweat

by delarue

Toronto band Surefire Sweat play a very tight, purposeful style of Afrobeat. Solos are short and succinct, the grooves a little heavier and more focused than most acts who jam out African-flavored funk. Their debut album is streaming at Bandcamp.

They open with Threshold, a brassy stomp built around an assertive, repetitive riff from tenor saxophonist Elena Kapeleris (their not-so-secret weapon here), baritone saxophonist Paul Metcalfe and trumpeter Brad Eaton.

Set to bandleader/drummer Larry Graves and bassist Liam Smith’s soukous-flavored groove, For All the Times I Never Came to See You has similarly punchy horn riffage and a bright, spiraling solo from Kapeleris.

The rhythms grow trickier and more loping in Sunshine Interference, with a jaggedly allusive guitar solo from Paul MacDougall. A Tale of Two Times is moodier and a lot closer to vintage Fela, Kapeleris’ long, pensive solo at the center. The band build RH Factor, a bright, cheery tune, around exchanges between Graves and percussionist Dave Chan along with a spacious trumpet solo.

The album’s catchiest and darkest number, On the Phrynge has some cool, subtle rhythmic shifts around an uneasy, trilling Kapeleris solo. Number Nine, a shout-out to longtime Fela drummer Tony Allen, slowly grows more complex, with accents from the whole band shifting through the mix. They close the record with Scuffle Strut, a slow New Orleans funk tune set to a pretty straight-up rock beat.