A Rainy Day Classic From the Early Zeros Finally Available on Vinyl

by delarue

Azure Ray‘s 2001 debut was a foundational album for the deluge of bedroom pop records that would follow throughout the decade, and remains a cult favorite. Finally, it’s been reissued on vinyl for those who prefer something sonically superior and longer-lasting than a Spotify stream.

And let’s cut to the chase: it has a previously unreleased bonus track, which is killer. Singers Maria Taylor and Orenda Fink join voices with their usual mistiness and an only slightly unrestrained joy in Witches, a steel guitar-infused, countryish escape anthem:

As they watched us share our souls they tried to copy us
But they’re witches, they couldn’t copy us
As they watched us from above
The knew they’d never love enough

And it’s fun to revisit the rest of the record. The big hit was Sleep, a chimy, distantly bittersweet post trip-hop song with a good facsimile of a mellotron patch wafting over all the loops. The hazy, summery waltz Displaced, the slightly out-of-tune, quietly defiant working couple’s ballad Another Week and the whispery, brooding cautionary tale Don’t Make a Sound hold up strongly twenty years after the cd first hit the record store racks (remember those?). Less so for the opaquely echoey Rise.

The dobro against a churchbell loop in the Beatlesque 4th of July is as offhandedly ominous as it was in the months before 9/11. The tenderly opiated, Elliott Smith-ish chamber pop of Safe and Sound, the lo-fi C&W of Fever and the faux tropicalia of For No One are no less pensively attractive for being period pieces. Awash in post-Velvets shimmer and strum, How Will You Survive serves as an uneasy coda. Looking back, there’s no counting how many other girl-and-guitars duos they influenced, all the way down the line from the groups here who on any random night could be found at the C-Note, to CB’s Gallery, the Blu Lounge and Pete’s Candy Store. Good thing this album still exists to remind us of the hope and resilience of that time.