Sharply Crafted Eighties Guitar Rock with a Snide Current-Day Esthetic

by delarue

The Doctor Swillings Band, once based in Maryland, are one of the rare rock acts who’ve been able to maintain their creativity by recording remotely this year. The now multi-state group – frontman Jon Lilly and special guests – have a very 80s feel, with sarcastic, quavery Dead Milkmen vocals and a snotty punkish edge matched to expert lead guitar that draws on decades of influences while retaining an icy, chorus-and-delay-pedal esthetic: haphazard elegance. As retro as their musical influences are, the issues they deal with are in the here and now: many of the songs deal with dead-serious implications of the lockdown. Their new album Making Monsters Men Again is streaming at youtube.

They open with the album’s simplest number, Oxygen and Gin, a clapalong over well-worn garage rock chord changes. With its icy,phased guitars, Shotgun Satan comes across as a mashup of early PiL and late 80s Psychedelic Furs, but with 90s vocals. “Drive like the devil’s in the car” is the message. The vibe isthe same in Greasy Monsters,awash in oscillating digital reverb and a cynical new wave drive .

2020 Survivor is built around a blippy synth patch and spare guitar jangle, a classic stoner lockdown theme reflecting one way to stay centered – more or less – amid this year’s relentless fearmongering and paranoia. The band get their bearings back with The Devil’s Wife, a slow/midtempo number with an ominous, allusive hook and a loopy vintage, Robert Fripp King Crimson guitar edge.

Action Man, one of the album’s sharpest, most focused tracks has a staggered beat and echoes of early 80s Siouxsie, with a boomy bass solo midway through. Wormhole, a rim sci-fi scenario, has a Lou Reed feel, its nails-down-the-blackboard Keith Levine tonalities matched to some metal crunch.

Jeff Bezos Space Center is definitely a song for this era, with its loping beat and falsetto vocals “Bezos, get out of my mind, whatcha gonna find?” From there, the band take an unexpected detour toward funk with the vampy When PeeWee Comes Back

With a ba-bump cabaret beat and burning distorted guitars, Maryland Manson very cleverly nicks the chord changes from the Sabbath classic Electric Funeral. The band follow with America’s Satan, a cynical political number with contrapuntal vocals over a blend of chilly 80s postrock and snide, phaser-driven metal: “Give me your money, your oil, your fear…your shopping, your lipstick, your fear!”

20th Century Masculine has a swirly mid-80s John Ashton jangle and crunch – think the Furs’ Mirror Moves album – over a ka-chunk, proto trip-hop beat. The album winds up with a couple of live tracks: Feeling Fantastic, a woozier, punkish take on the Blondie hit Dreaming, and You Don’t Know Me, which could be a Bowie psychedelic number from the Mick Ronson days, right down to the evil guitar duel midway through. Connoisseurs of smart, purposeful rock guitar are going to find a lot of inspiration here.