A NYC Debut This Week by a Killer Spanish Psychedelic Rock Project

by delarue

Weinf, a.k.a. Spanish multi-instrumentalist/crooner Dani Ruiz is the great psychedelic rock songwriter you’ve never heard off. His music compares with this era’s greatest American psych bands: the Allah-Las and Mystic Braves, to name just two.  British cult heroes the Frank Flight Band are also a good comparison, as are obvious influences the Doors and Nick Cave. Weinf’s latest album Purple Bird and Other Strange Stories is just out and streaming at Bandcamp, and he’s got a trio of New York shows coming up. This week, he’s at Sidewalk on July 4 at 9:30 PM and then back there on the sixth at 10 PM. Then he plays a Manhattan house concert on July 7 at 8 PM, email for location/info.

The album’s harrowing subtext is that it was recorded while Ruiz was undergoing intensive chemotherapy, no doubt adding to the gloomy ambience. It opens with a smash with The Sunset Cave, Pol Mata’s Ray Manzarek-ish organ swirling evilly over the bandleader’s punchy, incisive guitar chords. It’s sort of a mashup of doomy Doors psychedelia and allusively chromatic Radio Birdman garage-punk fire with a Nick Cave soundalike out in front.

A similarly ominous, slightly more low-key atmosphere permeates The Priest and the Thief, which wouldn’t be out of place as a midtempo ballad on the Doors’ Strange Days. Júlia Martín’e pouncing groove anchors the title cut, with its vampy, trippy Light My Fire vibe.

The Absence of a God Has Made Me Free veers between grey-cloud ambience and crashing Arthur Lee-style dark garage rock. The Finest Woman I Have Ever Met is a dead ringer for mid-period, epically-inclined Stranglers, with  less antagonistic vocals.

A starry swirl of guitar, keys and cymbals kicks off Fishes Swimming in the Sand, a surreal blend of Nick Cave balladry and slide guitar-driven pastoral psychedelia, vibraphone tinkling overhead. The album’s best track is Kafka on the Shore, Mata’s UV-ray electric piano flickering amidst Ruiz’s reverb-drenched jangle and clang.

Dana Colley’s nocturnal sax interlude opens the album’s most upbeat track, The Basement, an altered latin soul strut with LA Woman overtones. The album winds up with Carefulness and Other Bad Advice, a diptych that turns on a dime from poppy late 60s blue-eyed soul to darkly vamping Frank Flight gloom. Ruiz’s English lyrics are trippy, aptly metaphorical and aphoristic..and sometimes hard to understand. Happily, the words to all the songs can be found at his Bandcamp page. It’s hard to think of a more distinctive yet purist and consistently excellent psychedelic rock record released so far this year,

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