A Provocative, Wickedly Catchy New Album and a Rare Live Show by Nehedar

by delarue

Over the past few years, Nehedar has made a name for herself as an often brilliantly lyrical, eclectic songwriter spanning the worlds of psychedelic soul and catchy urban pop. Her songs are sparkly, and fun, and full of humor. She’s a tremendously good singer, with a clear, bright voice. By contrast, her lyrics have edge, and bite, and a persistent unease. They ask more questions than they answer, and get you thinking. And she’s a big-picture person; her definitive album so far may be 2011’s Power Plant Beach, whose sunny album cover depicts a nuke plant in the background.

Her new album Hello Abyss, streaming at her music page, is arguably the most rock-oriented thing she’s done to date. and might also be the musical high point of her career. The songs’ unifying theme is escape. It’s hard to think of a more apt title for anything released under the current political climate, isn’t it? When she’s not singing harmonies in the New York rock band Fierce Love, she tends to be a creature of the studio: she doesn’t play a lot of shows on her own. Which is why the album release show on March 15 at 9 PM at Bowery Electric is a pretty big deal. Perl Wolfe – former lead singer of Bulletproof Stockings, the Hasidic Sleater-Kinney – opens the night at 8. After Nehedar’s own set, she plays with Fierce Love, then sardonic new wavers Blanket Statementstein headline at around 11. Cover is $10?

Nehedar (real name: Emilia Cataldo) plays guitar and keys, joined on the album by Fierce Love guitarists Shaul Zuckerberg and Tim Rockmore, with Craig Levy on bass and drums. The opening track, The Story is a new wave soul tune complete with wryly warpy synths and deadpan funny electronic percussion patches that contrast with the lyrics, a rugged individualist surveying the terrain from an understatedly solitary perspective.

The second cut, Catacomb, is part eco-disaster parable, part kiss-off anthem to the powers that be, sung over a counterintuitively bouncy new wave pop tune. “Got their hooks in you, made you believe that their lies are true…get your brain back!” she insists. “The lights are bright, but it’s monochrome.”

Shedding Skin is a mashup of anthemic powerpop and trippy dub reggae with some Middle Eastern spice. How rises with echoes of gospel and oldschool soul into a big power ballad. Is it cynical to want no more than to be able to wake up into a world that doesn’t make you want to hide under your pillow, Nehedar asks us – or, is that merely being realistic?

“You’re never too young go know which way not to go,” she asserts in the surrealistically lilting Happy Birthday, with its boomy, brushed snaredrum beat and dancing bass. You’re Beautiful When You Fall Apart is a big rocker with a 60s psychedelic undercurrent, just like the following cut, Fear and Love, which is more poppy: “Let’s see the monster underneath the bed!” she challenges with irrepressible cheer. “”I’m gonna take you in the back room, show you all the monsters I keep in the rear!”

The album’s most striking and strongest track is The Grudge, a snarling psych-pop broadside: “It’s like the bottom fell out and left me in a civil war,” she laments. The final numbers here are the let’s-bury-the-hatchet ballad Tonight Tonight and Sotah, which rises from eerie folk noir to a big, roaring, angst-fueled, Santana-esque guitar anthem, with the album’s most dramatic, intense vocals. 

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