A Sizzling Hungarian and Balkan Twinbill Coming Up on the 17th

by delarue

In a city where you can see incredible music pretty much any night if you want, for nothing more than a few bucks in the tip bucket, how do you justify dropping $36 on a ticket? With this video. If the haunting, bracing minor keys and chromatics of Balkan and Eastern European music, or just plain raw adrenaline are your thing, you’ll have a hard time resisting the amazing doublebill coming up on June 17 at 8 PM at the Skirball Auditorium at NYU at the top of LaGuardia Place with fiery Hungarian band Muzsikás and awesomely shapeshifting Hungarian/American ensemble the Glass House Orchestra.

The latter group have an interesting backstory: led by iconic trumpeter Frank London – an original Klezmatic – they came together to play a blend of indigenous and Jewish tunes as well as their own material. Although London is his usual intense, resonant, frequently wild self in this project, their not-so-secret weapon is cimbalom player Miklós Lukács (fast forward to 57:50 for his most spectacular solo of the night). And there’s no other band on the planet who sound anything like them. This blog raved about their show last year at Drom, but the video – a complete concert recording from the Budapest Music Center this past January – is even more intense. It’s worth releasing as a live album. What jumps out at you right off the bat is how amazing a jamband these guys and women are. In over seventy minutes onstage, they barely break a sweat, even while they romp through innumerable dynamic shifts and sizzling solos.

Sometimes the band will build a slow, suspenseful intro; other times they leap into a song with a flurry of violins or horns. Béla Ágoston is a one-man reed section on a whole slew of instruments, most notably the bagpipes. London trades riffage with just about everybody in the band, and Rolling Stones saxophonist Tim Ries comes up to guest on one long, phantasmagorically epic number. Violinists Jake Shulman-Ment and Edina Szirtes Mókus – who also provides spellbinding, otherworldly vocals – team up for shivery staccato crescendos, soaring upward flights and mysterious ambience. Bassist Pablo Aslan anchors the music with a dancing pulse as drummer Yoni Halevy drives the juggernaut with a carnivalesque, sometimes vaudevillian flair. And guitarist Aram Bajakian wails and slashes, threatening to fall off his chair as he blasts his way through searing volleys of tremolo-picking and downtown jazz skronk, or adds mysterioso glimmer with his Lynchian jangle, particularly in what could be the night’s best number, a creepy bolero. But there’s way more than just this here…and it’s the best possible advertising the show on the 17th could have. Props to the Balassi Institute/Hungarian Cultural Center for putting the bill together.