New York Music Daily

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Two Cool Singles and a Funny Video

A lot of people send  videos and singles here. Most of those folks aren’t playing New York anytime soon, so those videos and songs sit…and sit…and sit. While it’s not likely that any of that stuff is going to go stale, there comes a point where it’s old news…meanwhile, all those songs are screaming to be heard. Songs are like people, you know?

So over the next few weeks, prepare to be bombarded by a steady stream of them, a few at a time, so as to keep you entertained without being overwhelmed. Here we go!

The Chemistry Set reinvents the Hendrix classic Love or Confusion as an Indian jam (soundcloud)

Mail the Horse’s Yer So Gone is a Rhodes-fueled noir blues song with some killer unhinged Steve Wynn style guitar (also soundcloud).

And here’s a LMFAO moment via youtube: watch the bartender pour the world’s shittiest drink at :39. The crappy autotune pop song isn’t worth hearing, but that scene is priceless.

Richard Galliano Brings His Meticulous, Animated Accordion Jazz to Town

As obscure subgenres go, accordion swing is pretty close to the top of the list. Accordionist Richard Galliano tackles that methodically and animatedly on his latest album, Sentimentale. He’s celebrating the release with a four-night stand leading a quintet at the Jazz Standard,Oct 23-26, with sets at 7:30 and 9:30; cover is $25, $30 on the weekend, Galliano is known for his ability to effortlessly leapfrog between idioms, from the baroque to tango to Romany jazz without missing a beat. This time out, he leads a pretty straight-ahead jazz session with Tamir Hendelman (the Clayton-Hamilton Jazz Orchestra pianist, who wrote most of the arrangements), guitarist Anthony Wilson, bassist Carlos del Puerto and drummer Mauricio Zotarrelli.

Much of it is a 21st century update on how French and Belgian musicians were mashing up American jazz with their own vaudeville and barroom folk sounds back in the 20s and 30s, notably the opening track, Chick Corea’s Armando’s Rumba, which puts a continental spin on a song that was already a bit outside the Afro-Cuban tradition. The group immediately brings it down from there, adding an organic touch to Dave Grusin and Lee Ritenour’s Canto Invierno, then tackling Ellington’s In a Sentimental Mood with a lilting rhythm yet also with a similarly distant pensiveness – the accordion is one of the alltime wistful/bittersweet instruments, and Galliano owns that feeling when he chooses to go there.

Galliano’s take of Horace Silver’s The Jody Grind draws less on the original than Dee Dee Bridgewater’s boisterous version; likewise, the Broadway ballad Why Did I Choose You follows Bill Evans’ coloristic reharmonizations. There are two originals here, the jazz waltz Balade Pour Marion and the closing cut, Lili, a tender ballad dedicted to Galliano’s granddaughter and done as a guitar-accordion duo. Hendelman’s arrangements are remarkably contiguous, more than just a platform for soloing, which there isn’t a lot of here.

The group gently bounce their way through The Island and Verbos de Amor, adding some bulk to the songs’ tropical balminess, then pair hard-charging swing with more pensiveness on Plus Fort Que Nous. They do the Coltrane classic Naima as surprisingly weird psychedelia with a guitar sitar (?!?), then go back to the tropics with Mantiqueira. All this is a good indication of what the band will sound like here, maybe allowing for a little more guitar, which won’t be a bad idea since Peter Bernstein will be filling that spot. And you’ll have to go to the show to hear it since the album isn’t anywhere to be found on the web.

Assessing Tamara Hey’s Intensive, Practical Music Theory Class

One aspect of the New York music scene that this blog hasn’t covered until now is music education. You can get as high-level training as you want in this city…if you can afford it. But you also don’t have to come from robber baron money to take advantage of some of the opportunities available to musicians who are hungry for practical knowledge.

It might be an overstatement to say that you get a semester’s worth of music school out of one of Tamara Hey‘s intensive Alphabet City Music workshops, but there’s still an enormous amount of material packed into a five-week course. Hey describes her Basic Theory 1 class – which this blog attended the previous time it was offered – as a way to learn to read and write music, understand keys, transpose melodies, create basic charts for songs, and have fun in the process. All of this is true…and there’s much more to it.

Be aware that Hey’s courses, taught in small groups with plenty of attention to students’ individual needs, are not for people who want to goof off in class or skip homework. On the other hand, if you want to get the most bang for the buck, you’re committed to learning a great deal of useful information in a short period of time, and you’d rather not spring for a huge student loan or pay conservatory tuition, these courses are a real bargain. The Basic Theory 1 with an Intro to Chart Writing Workshop will be offered again beginning on Tuesday, Oct 28 from 6:30 to 8:30 PM and continuing weekly through December 2; the classes are located close to the Astor Place 6 train station and 8th St. N and R stations.  No advance payment is required for preregistration.

And the material you get for outside of class is just as substantial: there are exhaustive ear training exercises based on a vast library of mp3s – enough work to keep you busy for a whole night – and also a workbook that enables you to build your understanding intuitively . It nudges you along so that if you don’t get something the first time around, you will the second time if you’re paying attention. Yes, there’s homework, every week, and yes, you’re expected to participate in class. That’s how it is in an elite conservatory environment, the kind where Hey received her training. But this is a lot less stressful and more fun.

Hey’s bona fides are her education (she’s a Berklee grad), her background (twenty years of teaching, beginning in her undergrad days) and her own tunesmithing. Her songwriting is catchy, counterintuitive and urbane to the nth degree, spiced with humor and clever puns. Maybe somewhat ironically, she’s not the cutup in class that she can be onstage. Leading a workshop, she’s all business. Don’t expect to be ignored in class: she likes to get a handle on what your individual goals and reasons for studying are and will direct her attention to you when a topic or device is particularly applicable. Her approach is friendly and down-to-earth but very focused.

What was class like? Intense. Hey moved through the material methodically, using examples from the past five decades of music as diverse as Roy Orbison, Chuck Berry, Cheap Trick and Tom Petty (remember, this was an introductory course). Who takes these classes? The students in this one included one of New York’s elite rock songwriters, who is now performing choral music as well; a longtime sideman with designs on leading a group and therefore in need of a refresher course in chart writing; a busy jazz singer, who was able to fix a messy chart in a pinch at a high-profile gig based on information learned in this class; a beginner singer-songwriter and guitarist; a retired pianist, and a nonmusician. While there wasn’t the kind of competition you might find in a music school environment, being around good musicians is like being in a band with them: they’ll push you to take your game to the next level. And there was plenty of that, with lively debate over technical issues, and terminology, and the minutiae of notating a melody, which Hey arbitrated with considerable relish. Moments like those are clearly fun for her, and she made them fun for the class as well.