Avi Fox-Rosen’s Album-a-Month Steak Isn’t Dead

by delarue

Since this past January, songwriter/multi-instrumentalist Avi Fox-Rosen has been releasing a new album (or at least an ep, to be precise) every month at his Bandcamp page as a name-your-price download. Has there ever been another rock artist who’s done that? He’s got two more months to go to bring the yearlong marathon full circle. Plenty of other artists, especially in the jazz and classical worlds, have pulled off similar feats – another multi-instrumentalist, Brazilian composer Hermeto Pascoal comes to mind. Then there’s John Zorn, who’s probably written or improvised at least one piece of music for every day he’s been alive.

Sheer volume aside, what makes Fox-Rosen’s stunt worth following – which this blog has done since day one – is that the music has been so consistently excellent. Of the ten albums Fox-Rosen has put out this year, only one of them is a dud, and that one is all cover songs. Whether this whole undertaking is just Fox-Rosen emptying a very deep songbook he’s been building for years, or coming up with new stuff month by month, isn’t clear, but it’s an impressive feat any way you look at it.

Having reviewed the initial release back in January, a mighty handful from February through June and then July and August together, it’s time to take a look at September and October’s releases. September‘s theme (each one of these explores a specific concept) finds Fox-Rosen confronting his Seventh Day Adventist roots (you didn’t think he was Jewish, did you? ha ha, jk…). One important thing to know about Fox-Rosen is his music has a dark, ironic (some might say Jewish) sense of humor. He is unsurpassed as a parodist…and the first song on this album sounds suspiciously like a spoof of indie whiteboy blues. The longer it goes on, the more he slurs his words. “I’ve lied, overcharging my credit card til the day I die,” he drawls. The second song, This Year, takes the dirty blues vibe in a White Light/White Heat direction – it reminds of Sway Machinery before that band discovered Malian music. Alone sets a gloomy existential lyric to pensive folk-rock, followed by the album’s real zinger, The God Who Lives in Your Head, where Fox-Rosen gets to do a pretty amusing one-man Oasis approximation. This particular deity is a real, um, meshugganeh: he’s a “meticulous accountant” who keeps a shit list, who watches you like a hawk, who “has a famously inflammable tongue – he gets dissed anytime anybody smiles, anytime anybody looks his damn way.” And he might resemble you more than you want to admit.  At the end of the album, Fox-Rosen finally lets down his guard with the broodingly catchy, nonchalantly haunting acoustic anthem Days Become Weeks Become Years. On this album, aside from a single percussion track from the ubiquitous Rich Stein, Fox-Rosen plays all the instruments.

The theme of October’s album is Scary. Here Fox-Rosen has a full band including Dave Melton on keys, Rima Fand on violin and Yoni Halevy and Chris Berry sharing the drum chair. The first track, Everybody Dies is basically Misirlou with lyrics and some snarling klezmer trumpet from Ben Holmes. Characteristically, Fox-Rosen’s black humor has a message:

Little boy, your german shepherd’s gonna die
The goldfish you won at the carnival’s definitely gonna die
Your teddy bear’s not gonna die
But the kids who sewed him at the factory are gonna die

Apocalypse Party is Fox-Rosen doing yet another one of his spot-on 80s imitations, in this case an irresistibly funny Prince parody. “This shit ain’t global warming, this heat’s not from the south,” he wants all the peeps banging in the VIP section to know. Terrified is a very different, and more subtle parody, a self-obsessed singer-songwriter contemplating the unthinkable fate of fading into obscurity – or simply into the background. When I’m Dead seems to be a spoof of hi-de-ho noir swing – and it would be a great song with or without the snidely macabre lyrics. October’s installment ends with I’ll Be Leaving, which is sort of a musical version of the movie Ghost…or something like that. It leaves the listener guessing to what degree it’s supposed to be funny or serious, one of Fox-Rosen’s signature traits and reason to look forward to what he’s got in store for November. He’s also got a couple of shows coming up, at 9 PM on Oct 10 at Pete’s and then at around 9 again on Oct 27 at Freddy’s.